Building site 1972-1975: Kensington Town Hall

I was talking to a meeting about blogging the other day and I showed the group a couple of pictures from the post about the Red House, like this one. They were interested so I decided to take the story further this week.

00 352NA3 17 Jan 1972 KE73-135

January 1972: in the foreground is the car park behind the then 12 years old Kensington Library. Most of  these pictures were taken from its roof. On the left is the civil defense hut. Next, just  visible through the winter trees is a white building, Niddry Lodge. Beside that is the Red House, owned and occupied by the Council at this time but formerly the home of a couple of famous people. On the right is Hornton Cottage, the last of the three houses to be used for residential purposes.

A few weeks later there is snow on the ground:

01 TH construction 1972 Jan KE73-94

The cars are all gone and most of the trees lie fallen on the ground. Demolition has begun at Hornton Cottage.

01a 352NA3 31 Jan 1972 KE73-92

The once secluded gardens are laid bare. The Red House is under siege.

02a 352NA3 7 Feb 1972 KE73-100

Almost exactly four weeks later all the buildings on the site are gone. For some reason two trees in the centre are spared.

03 352NA3 6 March 1972 KE73-86

May: Building materials start to arrive on the site as work begins. Compare the trees with how they were in the previous picture. Despite the imminent threat of destruction they carry on.

05 TH construction  09 may 1972 KE73-145

June: the ground level is lower than it was.

05a TH construction 1972 June KE73-146

A few men are wandering around the site. A couple of them are examining some large plans.

06 TH construction  07 aug 1972 KE73-70

August: more digging.

By the end of the year the site looks like nothing but a big hole.

07 TH construction  dec 1972 KE73-213

In the centre is that concrete platform with its surviving trees.

In 1973 the building work began in earnest.

08 TH construction 02 jul1973 KE73-194

There are actually fewer pictures from this year than others. I don’t know quite why this is but by early 1974 the work was beginning to affect the Central Library:

09 TH construction 23 apr 1974 KE74-55

This picture shows the entrance to the car park under the Town Hall site. Builders seem to be securing the area where the exit ramp will be.

On the main site the two levels of the car park are visible. Contrary to urban myth there is no third level.

10 TH construction 01 may 1974 KE74-54

By July the new building is rising above ground.

11 TH construction july 1974 KE74-82

This view shows the eastern side of the site.

12 TH construction aug 1974 KE74-98

What’s that octagonal structure?

14 TH construction 1975 March  KE75-43

This angle shows the space between the two wings of the building nearest to the Library.

Now it’s 1975.

15 TH construction 1975 March  KE75-44

The new building is now a confusing mass of concrete and scaffolding.

16 TH construction Apr 1975 March  KE75-57

On the left of this picture is the edge of the library. I should explain that there are roof terraces linking the west and east wings of the library and I imagine the photographer perched on a step ladder to take all of these pictures. He must have had a better head for heights than me. When I went up there last week to get some modern pictures I experienced a distinct feeling of vertigo, despite the fact that I was perfectly safe. The fear of falling is of course entirely rational. The fear of the heights themselves at least in my case is not. I require a significant thickness of glass between myself and the panorama below before I feel safe at height. Nevertheless I managed to take some pictures from a similar angle.

Copy of DSC_4317

And that octagonal structure?

Copy of Town Hall 1978 02a

It was a pond. In 1978 wild fowl were taking advantage of this amenity, but unfortunately the bottom of the pond was not watertight and there were problems with leaks which couldn’t be rectified. So today there is a memorial garden in the area which you can see in my first picture.

And that tree that seemed to hang on to life? Well there are three trees in the central open space. One of them is a memorial tree for Sir Winston Churchill, specially planted. Another commemorates the 1997 wedding anniversary of the Queen and the Duke of Edinburgh. But there is another one.  This is a tricky spot for trees to grow, with limited light but it could just be the same one.

Copy of DSC_4327

For the record:Kensington Town Hall, designed by Sir Basil Spence, built by Taylor Woodrow Construction Ltd. Completed in 1975.

Postscript

My apologies if this post is of greater interest to my colleagues than my general readers. But a building site is a building site and it is fascinating to see a large building take shape wherever it is. I hope so anyway.

Black and white photographs by John Rogers.

We still need to tell the story of Niddry Lodge. Coming soon.

About these ads

3 responses to “Building site 1972-1975: Kensington Town Hall

  • Susie Harries

    Certainly not just of interest to those who work in the building! – fascinating to see the differences that the Town Hall has made to the perspectives and proportions and atmosphere of the whole area – many thanks.

  • Colin Blackman

    I was a student at Queen Elizabeth College at the time and remember it well. The joke at the time was to watch out for kangaroos because of how deep the building site seemed to be from the road level.

  • Hasenschneck

    It’s really interesting to see these pictures. I lived in the upper part of Hornton Street from 1964-1992. How we hated the noise, traffic and most of all the dust from the construction of the new Town Hall. (I remember going with my mother to vote at the old one in the High Street).

    I’m surprised the library was so new at the time the town hall was built though. My first unsupervised childhood walk, aged 6, was to the children’s library as it was only down the street but I suppose everything seems old when you’re that age.

    The librarians used to let children ‘help out’ sometimes and it was my most favourite thing to stamp the return date in the books and file the library cards, or to find the tickets of books being returned in the long wooden boxes in which they were kept. No computers in those days but it all worked well enough.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 687 other followers

%d bloggers like this: