The end of Camelford Street

The name of Camelford Street is continued in one of the walkways on the Lancaster West Estate, which is what drew my attention to these pictures of the original street, which are part of our 1970s photo survey. This view is looking west.

 

 

In some ways a classic street scene from the 70s as we saw in Hurstway Street a few years go. The derelict properties, a few residents hanging on, and the inevitable varied collection of cars. Look at that Jaguar in the foreground with some damage to the front end. I once (in Dalgarno Gardens I think) came across a little crescent which seemed to be full of old Jaguars and Daimlers. (for another Jaguar story see this post).

Camelford Street was more or less erased by development in the early 1970s. For those of you who need a reminder, here it is on an OS map updated about 1971.

 

 

As you can see it was in  a block of houses and larger buildings  between Ladbroke Grove, Lancaster Road, St Mark’s Road and Cornwall Crescent. By the time of this map much of the demolition had already taken place. The 1935 map shows the houses which been there a short time before.

 

 

(Note the Convent on the other side of Ladbroke Grove. We had a look at that when the blog was young.)

Demolition had already begun in the picture below showing the rear of Ladbroke Lower School.

 

 

On the other side of the road there was still some signs of life.

 

 

This view is further up the road showing the exposed party wall of a house already boarded up, with the same estate car (a Ford? Or a Hillman?)

 

 

Beyond that a gap in the houses where you find the old school gates with signs for Girls on one side Infants on the other.

 

 

 

Next, another section of near complete demolition.

 

 

Solomon Wolfson School is visible in the background.

This is the final stretch of the north side of the street. Note the pile of tires on the left, a sure marker for imminent destruction it seems.

 

 

This is the south side of the street. There’s that Land Rover and that unknown old car from the first picture, and Kelly and Mick have left their mark.

 

 

On the left is the pub at the end of the street, the Ladbroke. Here is a better view.

 

 

This is the view looking back to the end of the street. That Triumph Herald on the right looks a bit the worse for wear. And is the vehicle behind it a little damaged too? Was it an informal collection of vehicles ready to be scrapped or broken up for parts? A lot of that sort of business was still done on the streets in 1970.

 

 

It really was another age. Ladbroke Crescent is now an innocuous cul-de-sac leading to a primary school behind a fence and a stand of trees which partially conceal it.

Postscript

I was amazed that there are still little streets I’ve never seen pictures of before. While writing this post I came across another so lovers of back waters and forgotten byways can reat assured that there will be more in the future.

 

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3 responses to “The end of Camelford Street

  • Michael Gall

    Overlooked, ignored, and nearly forgotten…but resurrected by your good self…we love it 😍 Well done Dave.

  • Zosia Evans (Kaminska)

    Thank you for this posting. My first home was in 12 Camelford Road. We lived opposite the school gate. I remember children playing in the street. All from different backgrounds. We lived in a basement flat. So good to be able to see the road again. Thank you. I remember the local shop run by Mr and Mrs Evans they were very nice people

  • Hilary Miklasz

    Thank you for enabling me to see pictures of our old street. We lived in 31 Camelford Road, housing conditions were pretty bad and people were poor but there was a sense of community and real characters. The old cars are there because there used to be a garage at the Ladbroke Crerscent end of the street. We were moved out in 1969 due to the slum clearance programme and were rehoused outside of the borough.

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